Any Pro Photographers/Graphic Designers Using TX Line?

Discussion in 'Hewlett Packard' started by ginakra, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. ginakra

    ginakra Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I was wondering if any professional (or semi-pro...or advanced amatuer!) designers/photographers are using the tx2000-tx2500 models? Do you use color profiles and what device are you using? Are you satisfied with the screen's color representation? I'd love to hear what you've liked and disliked about the tablet during photo correction/printing or your graphic design processes.

    Thanks for any input!
     
  2. Yianaki

    Yianaki Pen Pal - Newbie

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    I am not a professional but I don't think you could rely on the tx2500 models as your only PC. Something to take out with you and do some stuff yes. But you will have to finish up your projects on something else. The passive screen has a thick coating on it so not to scratch that really screws up the display. It isn't noticable on dark colors but is on an all white background. The screen has a greasy look to it under white light.

    I saw it under bad lighting at CC and it looked a lot worse than it really does. I don't know why. It's not that big a deal unless you were relying on the pc for true color representation.

    They should make it so that you can apply your own replacable screen protectors. That would help I am sure.
     
  3. eko2

    eko2 Scribbler - Standard Member

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  4. gordoncahill

    gordoncahill Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Full time professional. TX2011au is my main machine used every day. Been using a TX as my main machine for about 15 months. I chose the TX because I needed some grunt, and portability. About 50% of my work is on location and I didn't want to have to bother keeping two machines in sync all the time. So I've got the TX, and an external 24" monitor and all my printers and external drives hooked up to a quickdock. I also do a daily acronis backup to two portable HDD's that I rotate.

    Once calibrated the screen is OK. (not stellar but very usable). It's quite suitable for some field use. Side to side angles are OK but top to bottom viewing is not real good. Colours after calibration are accurate but colour space is limited (about SRGB). Brightness is fine and calibration will lower the brightness a bit. Before calibration the screen is quite cool when compared to an ICC standard. Reflections can be an issue. I'm happy to use just the screen for some lightweight tasks like real estate and architecural work, but for colour critical work I always check on an external monitor. But not many clients really require true colour critical work.

    Reflections are by far the biggest issue. In a dim room or away from a direct light source the screen is very viewable and usable. The screen does exhibit (like many tablets - not just the passive ones) some grainyness. But it doesn't affect your ability to evaluate images and after calibration whites are accurate tonaly and in luminence and gamma.

    Now having said it's not brilliant, I'd have to also say that there is only one laptop monitor that I was satisfied with as a reliable source. That was my Acer C111Tci which had a hydis display. But if you think th TX screen is grainy the Acer was a lot grainier and the reolution was limiting.

    My partner has a Mac Book Pro and compared to that the TX colours are about the same, side to side angle are "similar" (slightly better on the mac), top to bottom viewing is poor and the Mac is far, far superior in dealing with reflections. However the TX takes about 25% less time to process the same amount of time in Bibble and Lightroom.

    Aside from any issues perculiar to the TX2000 I just can't see long term critical work being done on a screen so small. On a larger monitor I can set uo so much better and therefore work far more efficiently. So my workflow is to do all the batch stuff and basic colour and tone corrections on the smaller screen and then go to the external monitor (also calibrated) for the critical stuff. I suppose I'm about 80% done on the smaller screen and then do the last 20% on the larger monitor. As an example, I'm just finishing off a 2000 shot wedding. The location, bridal and formals were done on the external monitor. I'm now well into the reception and I'll finish that on the lounge. I'll have a quick scan on the big monitor when I'm done but it's highly unlikely that I'll need to do any adjustments.

    Gordon
     
  5. CarlosG

    CarlosG Pen Pal - Newbie

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    full-time here as well, its mostly gonna serve as my note taker since im back in school, but I got it because I can do jobs during lunch break so I wont be so swamped when I go in after. I wouldnt even bother color calibrating the tx, though I suppose it would help a bit, problem is im always fussin with colors up to the last second! So I do most of my proof work on another monitor that is calibrated for the film printer.
     
  6. ginakra

    ginakra Pen Pal - Newbie

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    Thank you all SO much for your input on my question. Wow, you gave such helpful answers! Thank you!

    Gordon, your description of the color on the screen after calibration was just what I was looking for, and I appreciate the specifics. Would you conider buying the tx2500, if you had to buy another tablet, or would you look to a different one, like the Gateway. Have you seen other screens in person?

    Yianaki, does that film peel off? I thought I saw a thread on that somewhere, but everyone was scared to try peeling it off the screen :p.

    I am looking to have one machine do everything from web browsing to games, to photoshop graphic design/photo correction....for -$1300. ;P It seems it doesn't exist, but the hp seems closest. I'll get mine by Tuesday and try it out to see if the screen is "good enough" or if I'm going to sacrifice other things for a better screen. I will also try connecting another monitor and see if that helps me decide to keep or return. Thanks for that idea.

    Are all current tablet screens "grainier" and less useful for color correction than normal laptops?

    Thanks again, now I know better what to expect with the tx2500.
     
  7. gordoncahill

    gordoncahill Scribbler - Standard Member

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    Yeah, I've seen quite a few tablet screens. The best I've seen was the Fujitsu as far as having almost no "grain" at all. It's for all purposes like a "normal screen, but with beter outdoor viewability.

    For full time Photoshop work you'll need a full power CPU so that cuts out a lot of tablets that are "business" models. There's the TX series, a Fujitsu, the Lenovo X61 series and the Toshiba M700. I may have missed a couple. When I looked the TX was the best value FOR ME and was the best compromise for the way I work. And I'm very satisfied with my decision.

    Most tablet screens have some "grain" and the TX is not the worst I've seen. People seem to blame it on the passive layer but from my experience that's not always the case. I have passive screens (ie: a Sony UX) that are the best I've ever seen and active tablets (Acer C111Tci) that are way grainier than the TX. The Fujutsu I saw had a lower resolution (1024x768) and was considerably more expensive. I've never seen a Gateway tablet. They did a overnight shut and run for all their stores here in Australia. Left a lot of customers stranded. Will never buy one.

    Yes I'd be happy to buy another TX series. I don't need the graphics so I'll probably stick with what I have. The changeover price doesn't justify the difference. But I'll definately be looking at the TX3xxx or whatever comes early next year.

    Gordon
     
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