AMD Ryzen

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Steve S, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 AKA Hifihedgehog Senior Member

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    Agreed. I do not care how solid of engineering credentials he has, that was thoughtless and immature smack to feebly attempt to ignore a very potent opponent. This sort of behavior is one of the stereotypes engineer CEOs often gets associated with them in contrast to their MBA contemporaries: that they have the STEM smarts but they lack the street smarts. That said, Lisa Su of AMD is an engineer CEO and she was far more nuanced and strategic in referring to competitors like Apple in a recent interview.

    So far, I am not impressed by this new CEO's comportment. However, it is results, not words, that matter. So if he delivers, I do not care if he sounds like a raving lunatic in his interviews. It is leadership that brings solid results that counts and everything else is immaterial. The initial outer package does not look all that promising, though. We shall see, though. Markets can literally transform in a matter of years. AMD could be behind the eight ball in five years from now all over again.

    Referring to a slightly different market, SEGA, for example, was the world leader in gaming graphics thanks to their world-class arcade hardware which was a good five years ahead of the PC market. Looking back, at the height of 90s arcade, SEGA was producing arcade machines using their proprietary Model 2 graphics solutions beginning famously with the racing title Daytona USA in 1993 which saw no equal in graphics hardware in the PC market until at least 1998. Then, just a few years later, with what what would seem like just almost overnight, SEGA would begin to see their hold in graphics hardware begin to fade.



    With the demise of the Dreamcast in 2001, SEGA’s home game console business—perhaps due to neglect from their undue focus on their amusements business, which is understandable as SEGA holds the title of the most prolific arcade machine maker in world history having produced more machines to date than any other company—was all but erased by the likes of Sony’s PlayStation 2. Meanwhile. SEGA continued to be a world-class player in arcade machine production, but there too their proprietary arcade hardware was soon to be outclassed from the revolution of PC graphics cards. By around the mid-2000s, SEGA had all but switched to third-party solutions where they finally settled with embedded PCs (using the Pentium 4 and GeForce 6 series in the SEGA Lindbergh), for their arcade hardware, a natural result of the PC gaming market booming as NVIDIA and AMD each made tremendous strides in graphics technology. At this point, all within the matter of about a decade, SEGA went from hero to zero in the world of gaming graphics.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2021
  2. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 AKA Hifihedgehog Senior Member

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    upload_2021-1-21_0-52-40.png

    The Ryzen 5000 series mobile release comes with such valuable qualities as the legendary performance of Athlon 64 and the landmark efficiency of Core. In single and multi-threaded performance in tandem with power consumption, the underlying Zen 3 architecture is without peers.

    Link:
    AMD Ryzen 9 5900HX is now PassMark's highest ranking mobile CPU - VideoCardz.com


    I cannot wait to see what is in the pipeline with Zen 4 and 5 when we enter the DDR5 generation of memory. There is so much exciting work ahead and the heat is cranking up for AMD as Intel breaks out the brass knuckles hiring heavyweights from their Nehalem glory days.

    Link:
    Dylan Martin on Twitter: "Glenn Hinton, who was the lead architect for @intel's Nehalem CPU architecture, is rejoining the company to work on an "exciting high-performance CPU project." He said @PGelsinger becoming CPU helped finalize his decision. https://t.co/TfFypThoxP #intel $intc https://t.co/cEouTJnR8V" / Twitter
     
  3. instred

    instred Pen Pal - Newbie

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    So 3-5 years out Intel will have something to compete with AMD. Sad part is even with the performance crown AMD still will be shafted by most OEM's. All I wanted was a nice 2n1 like the Lenovo Thinkbook 14s Yoga with the AMD chip in it. Would make one heck of a portable DAW system for me with the two NVME slots and upgradeable memory. I know I can keep dreaming.
     
  4. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 AKA Hifihedgehog Senior Member

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    Their situation is looking pretty grim at this point. Intel has now admitted in their latest investor calls that they will not have 7nm processors now until 2023 at the earliest. Keen eyes and sharp minds will remember that only six months ago they claimed that they had 7nm on track for 2022. As history has shown us time and again, Intel is notorious for slipping calendar targets. You might say at Intel, it is no longer Moore's Law but Murphy's Law instead. The Intel who cried 14nm and 10nm now wants us to believe 7nm is finally coming on time. Tack another 1-3 years onto their pretentious best-case scenario estimate of 2023 and you should have something in the ballpark of reality. The sad commentary is AMD will likely be on TSMC's 3nm manufacturing process at that time, and TSMC's 5nm is already highly competitive with Intel's still unreleased 7nm. So if you work out that fuzzy math of product competitiveness, Intel is bound to be in dire straights, to the point of being perhaps even surpassed in market cap at that point by AMD.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2021
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  5. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  6. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 AKA Hifihedgehog Senior Member

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  7. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  8. Steve S

    Steve S Pen Pro - Senior Member Super Moderator

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  9. JoeS

    JoeS I'm all ears Senior Member

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  10. sonichedgehog360

    sonichedgehog360 AKA Hifihedgehog Senior Member

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    To be honest, ARM and X86 each are relatively inefficient just from the sheer immensity of their colossal instruction sets. Stepping outside of the hype, modern ARM, in an effort to appeal to developers, has actually become very CISC-y exceeding well past 1,000 instructions just like X86. So realistically, if we are going to see any true chip innovation, I strongly suspect it will need to be with a starting-from-square-one, unspoiled instruction set like RISC-V, which has a far leaner and meaner approximately 100 instructions. Heck, if they were able to manage even half of this efficiency scaled up, RISC-V would make ARM and X86 irrelevant overnight. The performance per watt here is absolutely mind-blowing compared to anything in the mainstream market. This RISC-V processor consumes a mere 69mW while outperforming a Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 which has a 11W TDP. That equates to around 200 times the performance per watt! You've heard of all-day battery, right? How about all-week or maybe even all-month battery life? The question now is: which major player will be the first brave soul to take the plunge into the mainstream market with a RISC-V product?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Link:
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/risc-...rting-to-produce-technological-breakthroughs/
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2021
    RT545 and Marty like this.

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