AES vs EMR: Active Pen Technology Explained

Discussion in 'News Headlines' started by Administrator, Nov 15, 2016.

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  1. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

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    There are two main digitizer technologies: Electromagnetic Resonance (EMR) and Active Electrostatic (AES). We covered the basics of each in our last active pen explainer, now let's take a look at their strengths and weaknesses.

    Wacom CintiqYou’ll find Wacom’s EMR technology in is professional-caliber devices, including Cintiqs and the Wacom Mobile Studio Pro line, complete with marketing and prices targeted at professional artists and designers.

    Read the full content of this Article: http://www.tabletpcreview.com/feature/active-pen-technology-explained-aes-vs-emr/
     
  2. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    Very "meh" article that doesn't get the differences across. The one-and-a-half paragraphs about parallax are particularly iffy. Both EMR and AES can suffer from parallax if there is a gap from where the pen touches (the surface of the display) and where the cursor appears (the physical pixel array). It's just a coincidence that EMR devices historically had very large air gaps. There is nothing stopping anyone from creating an EMR or AES device with an optically-bonded display, or an EMR or AES device with a huge gap between the physical pixels and the surface of the display. There is no inherent quality in EMR that forces it to use displays with an air gap and no inherent quality in AES that forces it to use optically-bonded displays. It's just a historical coincidence.

    The explanation on why AES lacks edge drift is very lacking, and again takes a historical difference (certain Wacom's EMR implementations having insufficient shielding and calibration at the edges) and makes it sound like it's some inherent technological difference. If it was an inherent technological difference, then Samsung EMR devices would have edge drift... but they don't.

    I changed my mind; it's not a "meh" article, it's a bad article.
     
    Sergei and DRTigerlilly like this.
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