Acer Switch 7

Discussion in 'Acer (Gateway)' started by dstrauss, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Back in the day, the original N-Trig was also a "pen from hell". Yet its responsible for shaping the diversity of the tablet PC market we see today.

    Competition is always good in the long run...my hope is that Synaptics will (in its death throes), come up something completely new and surprise us all. ;)

    Bang on, Strauss.

    It's sad to see MS aping Apple's price tiering with RAM/accessories...I am so glad other OEMs are having none of that.

    16GB RAM right off the bat for the AS7 and N9P, pen of course included. At this rate, 16GB, w/stylus could become new norm! dGPUs might even become the new thing!

    It's a good time to be a TPCRer... :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
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  2. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    My real concern about the Acer Switch 7, at this point, is Thunderbolt 3 support. I've seen some bloggers/reviewers affirming it does, but I have also done some reading that the lightning bolt next to the USB-C port may just signify power out capability, and not necessarily Thunderbolt. At this point, I need to have docking capability for anything I buy, so here's hoping...

    PS - I haven't spoke up on this fact, but silence would be golden (if the processors don't melt)...
     
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  3. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    While I would definitely share in everyone's excitement over this tablet since it looks like a dream device for many of us....the inclusion of EMR I find somewhat perplexing. Samsung aside the Windows 2-1 market has shifted entirely to Wacoms AES tech...and other cases like Cube were just using old leftover Surface Pro 2 digitizer stocks.......now if Acer really wanted a silo, they could have easily done a Wacom Supercap charger AES Pen like Lenovo used....and the specs are on par with AES Gen 13 as well........so why the switch to EMR when from a marketing standpoint they could have produced the same product and specs just without the EMR?

    Either Acer......Specifically wants EMR.....or Wacom themselves are trying to push EMR back in the game.

    Also the pics of the silo pen look like it uses the older thicker Nibs.....not the super thin literal toothpick nibs Samsung is currently rocking....Specs and nib size aside, I'm somewhat curious how this pen will actually perform.....like Old School Surface Pro 2 EMR......or if it will actually perform the same as Samsung current S-pen standard?
     
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  4. dstrauss

    dstrauss Comic Relief Senior Member

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    Bottom line, I don't thick you will find any equivalent to the EMR "S-Pen" size that can be easily siloed in the frame of a modern 2-in-1. I found this article about supercapacitor stylus for the 2015 Yoga (Gizmodo), but I don't ever remember seeing one in real life. Did they really ship, and where are they now?
     
  5. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    From my (limited) understanding talking with the EVE folks, it's a bit of both. OEMs will typically shop around when choosing a digitizer supplier. When Acer approached Wacom, Wacom didn't push AES as before, but instead focused on the advantages of EMR—a strategy they seem to be stepping up in 2017.

    I speculated earlier that Wacom's strategy changed abruptly back in the later half of last year, when it went through some loss in investor confidence.

    They (correctly imo) determined that if they continued pursuing AES, they would forever play second fiddle to MSPP and essentially lose all development control of the hardware standard. Realizing that their market advantage lay in EMR, they decided to relegate AES to a secondary revenue stream (Bamboo Ink Smart), and instead push 1st-party partners towards EMR solutions.
     
  6. bloodycape

    bloodycape Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    So is the lower spec models also quad core with a gpu, or just quad core with intel gpu and lower storage of course?
     
  7. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    Probably still on the Best Buy and Micro-Center Store shelve as they’ve been for the past few years now. So far Lenovo’s the only one who’s utilized the Supercap charged/Silo S-pens….but that proof of concept is well beyond the concept stages. I've encountered them many times.
     
  8. darkmagistric

    darkmagistric Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    That’s the part that doesn’t make sense. Before AES, Wacom EMR was already becoming second fiddle to N-trig….thats the whole reason why they made AES which for a time overtook the whole market. And case is, the current offering of N-trig rebranded as MPP…is still Surface Pro 3 era pen performance……While you can argue that Wacom EMR is Superior to Wacom AES…..AES is still superior to the generic MPP out on the market right now. And you still have to factor in the benefits to the manufacture that AES presents…..Overall cheaper to implement, No sensor board needed, less power drain on the device, reduced cursor drift and better edge accuracy, and with AES it’s easier to incorporate Magnetic based accessories like type covers without hampering pen performance.

    The only real market advantage EMR gives them over AES is to the Artist crowd…..which is still the lowest cared for market segment of the 2-1 market. That and with the tremendous Best Buy marketing push Wacom put forward with the Ink Pen….literally littering the entire PC section of every Best Buy with those Ink Pens and Ads…..it’s even more perplexing they would encourage there to even be more devices not compatible with the INK pen. Even if they lose money outright to MPP devices….the Ink Pen because of its dual protocol nature would financially benefit Wacom the most provided most devices are either MPP or AES. Opening the flood gates to EMR again seems oddly counterproductive since that throws another device on the store shelves unusable to the Ink Pen. Unless Wacom already considers the Ink Pen a financial flop…..but even then…I don’t see how Wacom can retake the market back from MPP by going back to EMR when EMR was how they lost it in the first place.
     
  9. ATIVQ

    ATIVQ V⅁O⅄ Senior Member

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    Fujitsu has a rechargeable AES pen, and Huawei has a rechargeable AES pen with LASER.

    Wacom can push EMR as the premium pen technology only for so long. Once MPP fixes the slow line jitter and gets the polling rate up to 200Hz, EMR will have nothing left, except maybe the ruggadized tablet market.
     
  10. Marty

    Marty Scribbler - Standard Member Senior Member

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    There's a couple factors, I think you guys aren't giving enough weight to:

    1) The first is that within AES, given a choice, OEMs will generally prefer MSPP if simply because it has better integration with Windows Ink and they are not at the mercy of Wacom to issue (inevitably buggy :p) driver updates whenever Windows 10 introduces new inking features. Given approximately equal price points, there is not much reason for OEMs to choose Wacom AES over MS PixelSense.

    2) Secondly, the development of EMR is not static—and it got a big kick in the butt, once Wacom realized MS was threatening its professional market base. Samsung implementations of EMR use incredibly thin digitizer boards w/shielding that are integrated directly into the display assembly. They are also power-efficient and edge-accurate enough that these are almost negligible factors in the overall component build. Parallax issues with EMR were solved with the next generation of DTK boards and optically-bonded displays (MSP and Dell Canvas).

    So contrary to our predictions, it's actually been EMR that has been closing the gap with AES, while PixelSense has made relatively little progress in jitter and is experiencing teething issues with new hardware development (eg. tilt quirkiness on the SPv5).

    While MS is pre-occupied, it makes perfect sense for Wacom to lock down as many partners as it can to EMR (Samsung, Acer, Steadtler), thus extending its hardware control into the next generation of Windows tablets. All the while, it can dip its toes in the AES consumer market to profit from MS' success.

    It's a smart strategy. And honestly, it probably saved them from becoming nearly market-irrelevant in 2017 (as many of us grimly forecasted). Meanwhile, this all benefits us the consumers the most, as it places great pressure on MS to improve PixelSense.

    Either way, we get great inking. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
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